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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
here. also when you think back to what happened with irene, there was concern about flooding on the sound side here of the outer banks, so, you know, this area is prone to flooding. that's something that everyone's keeping a close eye on. also the winds out here are picking up. they've been right around ten to 25 miles per hour off and on. the rain off and on. but the situation out here will deteriorate as the day goes on. this area remains under a flash flood watch and a tropical storm warning. so people are taking stock of that. they're getting supplies. a lot of peel pl-- people planng to ride this storm out. we talked about some of the people who hadn't boarded up their windows. it turns out there's a mix of people there. are some people who have homes here who don't live here, so those homes have not been boarded up. some people who plan to ride the storm up. that's what we're seeing here. some who have left the area. because when you think back to what happened with irene, irene was more of a direct hit. people saw a lot of damage in this area. this time they're expecti
irene, which hit last august in the same area. but by any measure, this storm, seemingly crushed irene. there really is no comparison, right? >> there's no comparison. i guess you could say, this is kind of like new york city's katrina. just devastating impacts here. this historic surge, 13 feet. all of that water coming on and those high wind gusts. worst-case scenario did pan out here, unfortunately. >> all right. mark mancuso, from accuweather. thanks for joining us this morning, mark. >>> straight ahead, more of our continuing coverage of sandy. the airlines trying to get back to normalcy. and what the red cross is doing to help out. >>> plus, more incredible video from across the storm zone, including rescues that didn't have to happen. we'll be right back. new pink lemonade 5-hour energy? 5-hour energy supports the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. >>> welcome back, everyone. 5 million people take the new york city subways every day. and this morning, the entire system is shut down. seven subway tunnels under the east river are flooded. and the electricity that pow
a blustery, nasty day. >> before this made landfall, this storm seemingly crushed irene. there really is no comparison, right? >> there's no comparison. i guess you could say, this is kind of like new york city's katrina. just devastating impacts here. this historic surge, 13 feet, all that water coming on in and the high wind gusts. worst-case scenario did pan out here unfortunately. >> all right. mark mann cue sew from accuweather. the airlines trying to get back to normalcy and what the red cau cross is doing to help out. >> plus more incredible rescues that didn't have to happen. we'll be right back. en. we'll be right back. >> announcer: "america this morning" brought to you by 5 hour energy. 5-hour energy supports the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. so i can get the energized feeling i need and support a great cause? i'm sold. pink lemonade 5-hour energy? yeah and a portion of every sale goes to the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. i'm sold. new pink lemonade 5-hour energy. get the alert, energized feeling you need and support breast cancer resea
. >> larry, people are comparing this storm to last year's hurricane irene the tenth costliest in history. now from its command center today, home depot sending sump pumps, shop vacs anticipating lining irene a lot of coastal and inland flooding. for home depot that means demand for carpeting picks up after the storm. if there's any extra profit for the retail that comes out of this storm it comes from demand not pricing. home depot locked in prices this morning just to make sure that consumers will not get gouged. as for paying for the property, property and casualty insurers in good shape thanks to higher premiums and a lack of major events. a major storm may allow some of them to pass on higher prices to their clients. restaurants will see business decline. restaurants like this group you see here can take solace from the fact the storm is hitting did your the slow part of their week. as for the power provider the big exposure these four have in the mid-atlantic region where the heaviest rains and flooded is forecast. any earnings risk lies in prolonged outages in those areas. farther
, and the like. just to give you some perspective, last year, during irene, large sections of roads were washed away here in north carolina. power was knocked out to about half a million people, and seven people died. so, even -- and that was a low-end storm. i wouldn't really read in to much to the fact that this is a tropical storm or a low-end hurricane. either way the effects are going to be devastating and now is the time when people really do need to prepare, alex. >> i'm glad you're putting that reminder out there. it's absolutely true. just because it says tropical storm right now, don't let your guard down. julie martin, thanks for watching things for us from north carolina. we're going to check back in with dylan dreyer at the bottom of the hour for the very latest on the path of the storm. al roker will also be coming our way from delaware. >>> back to politics now. today republican presidential nominee mitt romney heads for florida to campaign with senator marco rubio. governor romney and vice presidential candidate paul ryan had a big rally in ohio, and today congressman ryan is on
through the potomac highlands. very dangerous storm situation here. it is expected to be worse than irene was. please, i'm going to beg our viewers, take this very seriously. >> all right, again, keep updating throughout the day and throughout the week, gwen. thank you very much. >>> well, also, virginia on the mind of many folks. flooding is expected in many parts there. we go to the phone to governor bob macdonald. thank you for joining us, governor. >> thanks, melanie. appreciate you having us on so we can talk to the viewers about getting ready for the storm. >> and so what are you bracing for in virginia right now? >> well, the biggest threats are the sustained, sustained combination of wind, rain that causes downed power lines. we're expecting sustained winds of 50, 60 mile-an-hour near the coast with 8 to 10 inches of rain. and you do that from sunday to wednesday and you're looking at downed trees and power outages. and that's our biggest concern. then follow that by cold as opposed to the heat we've had with other hurricanes. we just want to have people be prepared, take all the
. but people are taking preparations. and perhaps because of this, victor. when irene came through, irene was more of a direct hit in this area. in fact, there's a coastal road that runs along here, highway 12, a good part of that was washed out. they're not expecting quite a direct hit with this particular storm, but again, they are talking about the wind, the rain and power outages. and victor, that's really what people are bracing for as the storm gets to us. >> i'm wondering, george, i saw an analyst yesterday saying this is going to be a lot worse than irene. are people sticking around for it, or are they boarding up and getting out of town? >> reporter: you know, when you walk around, when you take a look at how people are preparing for this storm, everyone's keeping a very close eye on us, as we report what's happening. they're watching the track of the storm system. right now it looks like it will move in a little further north than where we are. but we will feel the first brunt of the storm. we will see a lot of the winds that come through, the winds that could get up 40, 50 mile
. this storm looks to be very different than irene a year ago. irene was more of a direct hit in this area. this storm looks to be bringing just more rain, the winds, so people are paying a close eye on what happens with that. >> all right. thanks so much. keep us posted throughout the day. you saw the map there of the expected track. again it's not far off the coast of charleston, south carolina. going to make its way past the north carolina coast. let's check in with meteorologist alexandria steele. when we talk about 300 miles off the coast we can see it's enough to kick up the surf but those low-lying areas like a beautiful city like charleston, they don't have to worry about too much, do they? >> right. well you know, you talk about this. we are seeing a hurricane for sure. of course and we're going to see it along the coast like we normally would. we have our reporters along the coast like we do. but what makes this tropical storm so anom mow his, a, it's the hurricane now, so we have all that moisture, but it's also really going to morph into this powerful hybrid of a storm. the tro
whether to shut down any public transportation as it did during irene. airlines are predicting cancellations and waiving change fees for passengers who want to reschedule. stay with 11 news for the latest on hurricane sandy, get updates on live wire and see how to prepare for power outages, on wbaltv.com and our mobile app. >> 5:09 and 59 degrees at b.w.i. hurricane sandy scrambles the final full week of campaigning for the presidential candidates. how both candidates are making the most of their time. >> cubans clean up after the destruction sandy left behind. >> tony has the latest on sandy in the insta-weather plus forecast next. stay with us. beep-bop-boop-bop boop-beep. [monotone] she says, "switch to progressive and you could save hundreds." call or click today. denny's everyday value slam egis four dollars every day. wait, is that right? eggs, bacon, pancakes. yeah. that's right. the four dollar everyday value slam. only four dollars every day. only at denny's. vo: for cold and flu season, honey, don't use your sleeve. there's clorox bleach. music: guitar, clapping and m
say it can be worse than irene. >> don't pay attention to it being downgraded. it doesn't mean anything. it's not really completely a tropical storm. it's going to be transitioning to what we kind of consider a nor'easter. we are accustomed to nor'easters. that kind of a event. moisture associated with a tropical storm. tropical storm holds a lot more water in the atmosphere as it transitions. that water is still going to be there radar picture showing the rain is following across parts of the carolinas. the rain is going to be heavy all day. battering waves, a lot of wind. beach erosion and that sort of thing here. go forward on the track of this storm. continues to move northeast. takes this unprecedented left-hand hook. that's where we've begin to go through a transition to a different type of a storm. people are used to hurricanes strengthening when there is warm water. this isn't going to be strengthening for those purpose purposes. snran way a nor'easter strengthens. european model track shows this. right around parts of jiewj. i want to point out other things on this map
irene caused loss of power, this time even more could be left in the dark. >> when you're facing 50 60 miles per hour with all the leaves on the trees and a soaking rain we'll see trees come over and branches come down. >> reporter: up and down the eastern seaboard 20,000 utility workers are standing by to turn the power back on. five refineries along the threatened east coast that produce 7% of the nation's gasoline are expected to suspend operations as early as sunday. that could put upward pressure on the of gas. presidential campaign. parts of three battleground states north carolina virginia and ohio are directly in sand chip's path. now vice president biden already had to cancel an event that was scheduled for this morning and mitt romney cancelled one for tomorrow. both campaigns are worried about the effect of this storm on early voting. >> thank you, chip. to get a handle on the strength of sandy and the path it's taking we turn to david bernard, chief meteorologist in our miami station wsor. also a cbs news hurricane consultant. david good morning. >> go
, and irene, lost their home so they came over and they stayed with sheridan and his brother at their home, which was not damaged by the fire. so they were married, and he ended up having three daughters and a son. and she was, i think in her early 20s when they married in 1875, and he was 42 or something like that. very happy marriage, and then they all moved to washington when he became general in chief. but he did not have a home life. his life was the army. >> he was there because of the expansion of the north. was it just northerners or was it southerners in the manifest destiny, too? >> they were into it, too. definitely. >> what happened with regard to -- if the south had won. >> i think so. they were into it because the -- before the war because they hoped to get more slave states and keep the balance in congress and everything. but, yeah, there were southerners -- but the great majority, i would say, just because of the way the population was, and the immigrants all came into the northeast. they kind of flowed from the northeast, through the midwest, and on out. but there were som
this will be worse than hurricane irene last year. they are anticipating this will be worse. here at rehoboth beach, it's a crowded boardwalk. this is for the sea witch festival. a lot of folks coming out. they are not afraid of what's coming. they are actually anticipating that tomorrow they'll keep the festival going tomorrow, but come sunday night, they are expecting things are going to go downhill pretty quickly. monday night is when the event really happens. a lot of rain, a lot of wind. they are anticipating a lot of beach erosion here. as this storm moves further inland, they are also very concerned about the inland flooding. as this moves further northwest, it's going to collide with that cold front. that's where you get that frankenstorm coming into play. that's where it will create snow and rain further up west. >> thanh truong, good to see even with the storm looming, folks on the boardwalk love being on television. appreciate that, sir. we will have more on hurricane sandy here on msnbc. right now we turn back to the race to the white house. back to new york where richard lui has a look
the storm could be stronger than irene which cause more than $15 million in damage last year. strong wind from the hurricane could be health 100 miles -- be felt 100 miles away. >> going to be high winds and rain what we expect so you don't want debris around the house. travel plans should be changed. >> winds are reported to be up to 75-miles an hour. the hurricane was down graded to a tropical storm but was then upgraded again. it has gained strength. >> who knows where it'll make landfall. for more on the path let's check in with rosemary. >> good morning to you. giving you a look at sandy. it's churning off the carolina coast. it'll run parallel through the weekend. normally it would continue this track but we have a pattern blocking it from moving this direction so it's expected to swing west in the coming days. this is the second system that's going to bring it real trouble. we have a cold system, a warm system and the two colliding are going to be major impacts to areas along the east coast and seaboard. we have a forecast here that runs, it looks like between washington and ne
the outer banks, they're worried that could be washed out, parts of it, as happened back with irene. people are paying close attention to the radar, watching the track of the storm. just to see how it affects this area. >> but clearly, george, the streets are pretty dezrted around there, are they not? a lot of vacation homes, as you mentioned, some folks who are living there kind of part time. of those who have decided to kind of wait out the storm, are you hearing very much from them? >> they're seeking higher ground. they're not leaving the island. some people have left, but a lot of people are staying to ride the storm out, going to hotels, going to areas around the outer banks here where they know it's higher ground. they also know the spots that flood. and that's what they're keeping an eye on. >> thanks so much, george. we'll check back with you momentarily. meantime, let's head north now. virginia is one of the places that is also concerned about what the storm could bring. athena jones is in a really beautiful part of virginia, northern virginia now, old town alexandria where it loo
we saw with hurricane irene. interior sections for northern vermont and those things probably not as bad. coastal areas absolutely. here is a look at this storm right now doesn't look all that impressive. it looks big. you talk about this being a nor'easter. it's pulling all of this tropical moisture. storms hold a lot more moisture. you can have that much moisture ringing out into a nor'easter. that's why the rain is going to be so significant and going to be a very windy storm. rain already into florida. and we have had that there for 36 hours now. tonight moves in across parts of the carolinas. gets worse. the track does typically does. the start it moves off towards the northeast. then it cuts back toward the west. this is where it gets very interesting. don't pay that much attention to this. this category one hurricane. it's not going to be a typical hurricane and it's going to be strengthening as it makes landfall. we're going to be talking about major problems here. look at one of these models. anywhere you see the green and the blue, that's heavy rain. that's from main
during irene. i want. i live across the river. they were -- they say they're fine but i said get observe here, i'll take you home. >> any word on when they will come out? are officials going for them in boats or trucks? do you know when they're going to arrive? >> looks staggered. i got one aunt and took her to a cousin's house. yeah, go outside, flag someone down. >> right. it's hard to get information. best of luck. this is the case. officials are doing the best they can but it's hard to keep tabs who is here, who is not. we see cars streaming in all the time as people go in. water here. there are towels, dry clothes. people are coming off trucks and boats with just the clothes on their back, maybe a small bag, some have no shoes. trying to get them as much as they need. officials on the teeterboro airport came over looking for someone saying we've got supplies, we want to help you out and give you supplies. imagine officials more than happy to hear that. but these residents are absolutely shocked. not expecting this. this was not an evacuation zone. >> i can relate to your guest there
. if i have to look at what was done in the aftermath of irene just as an example i think people were generally pleased with -- you know, with the results and with fema. i know a lot of times they get beat up because obviously when somebody comes in the middle of a disaster, you know, there's a lot of decisions that have to be made on the spot and sometimes they don't seem to be the right ones but i think overall fema does a good job. >> bill: are they responsive when you contact them regarding particular problems in your district? >> oh, absolutely. and we're going to really need them after this storm. no question about that. the other thing i should mention, too, is that when we do a lot of the beach replenishment projects or other federal projects with the army corps i think people don't realize a lot of it is -- you know, is preventives. in other words, in a place like seabright or monmouth beach if you didn't have the sand, the hurricane's consequences would be a lot worse. >> bill: right. >> so it is also preve
they know the drill. thanks to hurricane irene last year. >> w actually got engaged here last year. and the storm came in last year. we had to leave early. now we're here. we got married on our honeymoon. and the storm came in again. >> some luck. so far no evacuation orders have been issued for the town. our own erika gonzalez is in rehoboth and caught up with the "today" show's al roker who says sandy is a storm we'll be talking about for a while. >> you have to be prepared for a lot of rain and you have to be prepared for a lot of wind. i think you got to be prepared for a storm surge and if you're not along the coast don't think you're out of the woods either because, you know, the parts of inland maryland, virginia, pennsylvania, all going to see effects from this. so i think this is a storm that could be really one we'll be talking about for years to come. >> next the arrangements you may want to make now. >> we'll also take your questions on facebook and twitter. send them to us right now. use the hash tag sandy d.c. we'll try to get to as many as possible. >> storm team 4 i
of practice with stuff like this, whether it's irene a week ago, isaac, months ago and we're mobilizing blood, making sure the blood supply needs to be in the key areas of the country. >> rick: the last minute preparations, there isn't a lot of time left. any last minute thing you can suggest to people that they do? >> the most important thing right now in the last minute if there's little time to get out and make sure you've got the food and water you need in terms of your kit, is to have a battery operated radio, something that can give you the ability to listen to any evacuation orders or any emergency notices that may be going out. >> rick: all right, charles one last thing-- >> mention that the red cross has-- >> that's exactly where i was going to lead you i saw the phone in your hand and talk about an app? >> i am going to talk about a hurricane app. the red cross has a hurricane app that's available for apple and android, folks can download it, it's got a tremendous "i'm safe" feature that allows people with a one push of a button let friends and family know they're safe and an import
and inland, once it gets inland, this is not just a coastal event and as you remember tropical storm irene caused more damage inland than it did along the coast. this system could dump up it a foot of snow, parts of west virginia, ohio on into pennsylvania. andrea, this one is going to be a massive, massive problem probably for days to come. >> all right, al. thank you. stay safe. dylan dryer will be here with the rest of the nation's forecast in just a few minutes. here's lester. >> all right. hurricane sandy is already impacting the race for the white house. mitt romney and vice president joe biden each canceled planned weekend appearances in virginia. ron mott is in ohio and he's traveling with vice presidential candidate paul ryan. ron, good morning. >> reporter: good morning to you. as we all know it takes 270 electoral votes to win the white house. 18 votes are up for grabs in ohio and they just may be the most important votes of all. >> hello, nevada! >> reporter: along with the weather churning over the atlantic, president obama and governor mitt romney are whipping up a storm of t
. just like tropical storm irene did last year. the difference is, this is drawing in a lot of cold air from canada. it could produce up to a foot of snow in parts of west virginia, ohio, and pennsylvania. so we're talking about not only a tropical system with tons of rain and flooding and massive power outages but snow as well. the effects of this could be felt for weeks. >> okay, al roker, many thanks for that. >>> our colleagues at the weather channel are following this storm closely as well. we're going have a live report from meteorologist julie martin coming your way at the top of the hour. >>> from there to politics now, ten days to go until the election. today in his weekly address president obama's emphasizing the progress made four years after the wall street crisis. >> our businesses have added more than 5 million new jobs. the unemployment rate has fallen to the lowest level since i took office. home values are ride rising again and our assembly lines are humming once more. >> mitt romney and paul ryan are looking to gain momentum holding a rally last night in canton. >> i w
, under the name of irene dunne. at my age i have some from time to time started thinking about the end of things and it has occurred to me when my time does come i hope to go the way my dear old grand father did, quietly in his sleep, not screaming like the passengers in his car. [laughter] andrew made me laugh more than anybody i have ever met. we all loved andrew and andrew loved us. my wife, ali mills, was, loved so much by andrew and he said, i never dreamed that i would be in the same family with the mother from ""the wonder years"". he was so full of heart. the think i love most about andrew in terms his public persona how people on the left hated him until they met him and they started loving him. the "new yorker", sent a woman out to l.a. where we all live to do a piece on him. they did a long piece. she spent 10 days. brought the woman over to our house to meet us. i thought they would do a hatchet job. they did a love letter. she loved him. she couldn't say bad things about him. "new york times" wrote two major pieces about him in the last year of his life and they were both
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)